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         Us Arms Control And Disarmament Agency:     more books (15)
  1. US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Handbook (World Strategic and Business Information Library) by Ibp Usa, 2009-01-01
  2. Current articles of interest. the Library-Technical Reference Center, US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency by Anonymous, 1994-01-01
  3. Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (Paris, France, 13 January 1993) by US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1993
  4. Why A Nuclear Test Ban Treaty? by Us Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Publication 15, 1963
  5. Arms Control and Disarmament Agreements: Texts and Histories of the Negotiations by United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1990-01-01
  6. United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency - Worldwide Effects of Nuclear WarSome Perspectives by United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 2009-07-24
  7. World Military Expenditures 1971; World Military Expenditures and Arms Trade 1963-1974 by United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1974
  8. Worldwide Effects of Nuclear War: Some Perspectives by United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 2009-10-04
  9. ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGREEMENTS, 1980 EDITION by UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL, 1980
  10. Worldwide Effects of Nuclear War: Some Perspectives by S. Arms Control and Disarmament U. Agency, 2009-11-18
  11. Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance by Michael V. Deaver, 2001-07-31
  12. Documents on Disarmament 1966 by N/A, 1996
  13. World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers 1968-1982
  14. Current articles of interest (SuDoc AC 1.13/2-2:) by U.S. Dept of Agriculture,

41. Americans For Democratic Action And ADA Ed. Fund
The US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, whose able and dedicated staff worked day and night, played the major role in the success of the Conference. Sen.
http://www.adaction.org/NewPubs/419Weapons.htm
Americans for Democratic Action
1625 K Street, N.W.
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20006 Adopted 1992
Reaffirmed 1993
Reaffirmed 1994
Amended 1997
Amended 1998
Amended 1999
Amended 2001
Amended 2003
Control Of Nuclear, Chemical And Biological Weapons
No. 419 Now that nuclear confrontation between Russia and the U.S. may be a diminished threat, it is vital to focus on the dire threat to human populations from the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons in the U.S. and abroad. The threat stems not only from the danger that these terrible weapons may be used but also from unsafe storage and disposal of unused weapons, components, and byproducts. With Russia and the U.S. now committed to drastic reductions in such weapons, pressures must be exerted for all powers possessing them to make similar reductions. Most important, authorized U.N. agencies must be allowed full and open rights of inspection and appropriate controls in order to limit the development, transfer to or acquisition of such devastating weapons by other nations. Although the US is committed to weapons reduction, the Bush administration has yet to stop the development of new weapons, such as nuclear "bunker busters". Significant defense funds are being allocated to the development of these so-called robust nuclear earth penetrators. The U.S., in conjunction with other nations, should prohibit any laboratory nuclear design related to testing and to phase down its stocks to where they pose no offensive capability in the future.

42. Photos
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Counsel of the Central Intelligence Agency, Legal Advisor to the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and Staff Judge
http://www.virginia.edu/cnsl/photos.htm
Former Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger and CNSL Associate Director Bob Turner, after Secretary Eagleburger's keynote address to the National Security Law Institute participants. The University of Virginia School of Law in Charlottesville, Virginia, where the National Security Law Institute is held for each summer. Participants also spend four days in Washington, DC. Legal Counsel to the U.S. Arms Control and Reduction Agency, Mary Elizabeth Hoinkes, discusses current issues in arms control. Professor Emeritus Inis L. Claude of the Government and Foreign Affairs Department at the University of Virginia, and author of Swords into Plowshares , lectures on "Theoretical Approaches to National Security and World Order." A.E. Dick Howard, Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law and an internationally-recognized expert on constitution drafting, speaks on "Promoting Constitutionalism and the Rule of Law Abroad." Former Director of Central Intelligence, William Colby, was a regular speaker at the National Security Law Institute.

43. DutchESS, Dutch Electronic Subject Service
DutchESS, Dutch Electronic Subject Service, Title US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) (English) http//dosfan.lib.uic.edu/acda/
http://www.kb.nl/dutchess/89/77/info-2935.html
Title:
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) (English)
http://dosfan.lib.uic.edu/acda/

Author[s]
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (corporate author)
Description:
The site contains all kinds of information about the United States' disarmament policies. It offers full text fact sheets, speeches, treaties and agreements, reports, and historical documents. Type: Country of publication: text United States of America BC-CODE:
89.77 international conflicts: armament, arms, disarmament
Record creation date Record last updated Library code KB-RVDS

44. DutchESS, Dutch Electronic Subject Service
DutchESS, Dutch Electronic Subject Service, Titel US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) (Engels) http//dosfan.lib.uic.edu/acda/
http://www.kb.nl/dutchess.ned/89/77/info-2935.html
Titel:
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) (Engels)
http://dosfan.lib.uic.edu/acda/

Auteur[s]
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (corporate author)
Beschrijving:
The site contains all kinds of information about the United States' disarmament policies. It offers full text fact sheets, speeches, treaties and agreements, reports, and historical documents. Type: Land van publicatie: text Verenigde Staten BC-CODE:
89.77 internationale conflicten: bewapening, ontwapening
Record creation date Record last updated Library code KB-RVDS

45. Chapter 2 - Critical Months, Intense Preparations
to recommend that the new onsite inspection organization be placed in the Department of Defense or the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, came quickly.
http://www.dtra.mil/news/his_mat/books/infbook/ch2a.html
Using these National Security Council guidelines, the 10-person, JCS task force began its work. Brigadier General Eugene L. Daniel, U.S. Army, Assistant Deputy Director for International Negotiations, JCS, led the team. General Daniel, who had commanded the 1st Brigade, 24th Infantry Division and who had been involved with the INF negotiations in the preceding months, pulled the task force together and moved into temporary quarters at Buzzard Point in Washington, D.C. "There was no money," he recalled, "no people for a new agency, no structure, just an operational concept embedded in the INF Treaty." The task force also faced the pressure of events. A week after its first meeting, General Secretary Gorbachev arrived in Washington. The following day, December 8, 1987, Gorbachev and Reagan signed the INF Treaty. With the treaty signed, pressure mounted for defining roles, missions, requirements, resources, and service responsibilities. "There was no money, no people, ...just an operational concept embedded in the INF Treaty."

46. Project On Demilitarization And Democracy
FROM Pamela Richardson, Campaign Coordinator. DATE March 28, 1996. RE Meeting at the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. On
http://www.prop1.org/2000/pdd5.htm
THE YEAR 2000 CAMPAIGN
TO REDIRECT WORLD MILITARY SPENDING TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT TO: Endorsing Organization of the Year 2000 Campaign to Redirect World Military Spending to Human Development. FROM: Pamela Richardson, Campaign Coordinator DATE: March 28, 1996 RE: Meeting at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
On March 27, David Isenberg (Center for Defense Information), Jim Matlack (American Friends Service Committee), Caleb Rossiter (Demilitarization for Democracy), John Terzanno (Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation), Joe Volk (Friends Committee on National Legislation) and I met with Ambassador Ralph Earle, Deputy Director to John Holum, director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to present the campaign plan and ask for the administration's support.
We expressed our appreciation of ACDA's role as a proponent of arms control with in the United States government and our disappointment with ACDA's recent performance in one area its opposition to the campaign to ban landmines. We highlighted the 6 proposals from the campaign, using the expertise of the delegation. Ambassador Earle was very receptive and favorable to the overall plan. He pointed out that NGOs have much influence pushing issues in today's world. He applauded the fact that foreign as well as domestic NGOs are pushing the initiative.
Ambassador Earle suggested that we should consider using regional organizations such as ASEAN or OAS complementing the United Nations. He added the plan might be accepted more readily coming from regional actors than from the United Sates. He thought we should do a cost analysis of the proposal for special envoys to see if the plan is feasible. He thought we should do a cost analysis of the proposal for special envoys to see if the plan is feasible. He suggested that we try to set up a voluntary fund to which countries could donate, so that money will not be taken out of the U.N. regular budget, since the U.N. is in a financial crisis.

47. START II, Missile Non-Proliferation, And Missile Defense - List Of Speakers
Rodney Jones served on the START and JCIC delegations representing the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. He is currently senior
http://www.ceip.org/programs/npp/npstspea.htm
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace - Nuclear Non-Proliferation Project START II, Missile Non-Proliferation, and Missile Defense Seminar Speakers Hon. Alexei Arbatov has had educational background in the United States, as well as in Russia, and an illustrious and prolific publication career. Two years ago he was elected to the Duma, and was reelected in the December elections. Now he has become Deputy Chair of the Duma's Defense Committee, one of two pivotal committees considering START II ratification. Amb. Linton Brooks was the U.S. negotiator for the START I Treaty at its conclusion, and played an important role in the U.S. interagency process, and the negotiations with the Russians on the START II Treaty. Stephen Cambone has worked in the Department of Defense as a director for the strategic defense policy during the Bush administration and is now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, as a fellow and analyst. Seth Carus is well known as an author on both ballistic and cruise missile proliferation. He was a research fellow in the 1980s at the Washington Institute of Near East Policy. After that he served on the policy planning staff in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is now a research analyst at the Center for Naval Analysis. Robert Einhorn is currently the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Nonproliferation in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs. He heads the U.S. delegations to MTCR meetings and discussions on missile nonproliferation.

48. Carnegie Endowment For International Peace
Atomic Energy Agency. Michael ROSENTHAL, US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; Richard HOOPER, International Atomic Energy Agency;
http://www.ceip.org/files/events/Conference1997.asp?pr=1&EventID=155

49. Geophysicist Will Study Arms Control With U.S. State Department
Research and Information, will spend a year in Washington DC, as part of the William C. Foster Fellowship at the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
http://www.memphis.edu/releases/dec01/rydelek.html
December News Releases
G eophysicist Will Study Arms Control with U.S. State Department

For release: December 6, 2001
For more information, contact Amy Clarkson A University of Memphis professor has been selected for a one-year fellowship to assist the U.S. State Department with arms control and disarmament studies.
Dr. Paul Rydelek, associate research professor with the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, will spend a year in Washington D.C., as part of the William C. Foster Fellowship at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. The fellowship, with the Office of International Security's Bureau of Arms Control, will provide a national contingency of scientists to assist the government in addressing arms control, nuclear nonproliferation and international disarmament issues. As an expert in geophysics, Rydelek will be studying the effects of nuclear blasts on the earth's surface and atmosphere.

50. Summary Guide:
3.2 CONTEXT 3.2.1 Name of creator US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), 19451982 3.2.2 Administrative history The Arms Control and Disarmament
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lhcma/summary/xd70-001.htm
King's College London
Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
Summary Guide
Note : The item numbers represent a subset from ISAD(G) rules (General International Standard Archival Description) promulgated by the International Council on Archives to standardise archival description world-wide. Only item numbers relevant to our specific archive are included here.
3.1 IDENTITY STATEMENT
3.1.1 Reference code : GB99 KCLMA MF 161-171
3.1.2 Title: Documents on Disarmament, 1945-1982
3.1.3 Dates of creation of material
3.1.4 Level of description : collection level
3.1.5 Extent : 11 reels
3.2 CONTEXT
3.2.1 Name of creator : US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), 1945-1982
3.2.2 Administrative history
3.2.5 Provenance/source of acquisition : University Publications of America, Inc., Bethesda, MD, with fully indexed guide edited by Paul Kesaris.
3.3 CONTENT AND STRUCTURE
3.3.1 Scope and content Documents on Disarmament, 1945- 1982 is a themed microfilm collection including documents on arms control and disarmament developments, 1945-1982. Subjects include relations with the US Atomic Energy Commission; proposed prohibition requirements for the production of biological and chemical weapons; bilateral talks between the Soviet Union and the United States, including the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (START); US negotiations with aligned and non-aligned states; Commission on Security and Co- operation in Europe (CSCE) arms control talks; negotiations with UN organisations including the Ad Hoc Group on Disarmament and Development, the Commission for Conventional Armaments, the Disarmament Commission, international Atomic Energy Agency, and the Security Council, 1945-1982.

51. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Conference 1997 Agenda
Michael ROSENTHAL, US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Richard HOOPER, International Atomic Energy Agency. David FITE, US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
http://www.ciaonet.org/conf/cei01/

52. Bureau Of Arms Control
Policy oversight for the missions of Arms Control, nonproliferation, and politicalmilitary affairs. Merged with the former Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Many fact sheets, treaties and reports.
http://www.state.gov/www/global/arms/bureauac.html
The State Department web site below is a permanent electronic archive of information released prior to January 20, 2001. Please see www.state.gov for material released since President George W. Bush took office on that date. This site is not updated so external links may no longer function. Contact us with any questions about finding information. NOTE: External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views contained therein.
Bureau of Arms Control The Bureau of Arms Control is responsible for international agreements on conventional, chemical/biological, and strategic forces, treaty verification and compliance, and supporting ongoing negotiations, policy-making, and interagency implementation efforts. The Bureau of Arms Control leads efforts to negotiate new arms control agreements, primarily START III and other future strategic arms control agreements, and leads negotiating efforts in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) such as a cutoff of fissile material production and antipersonnel landmines. This Bureau also has the equally important task of implementing a large number of existing agreements, including ABM, INF, START I, CWC, and BWC, and of preparing to implement START II and CTBT. The Bureau has the U.S. lead for negotiations and policy development related to Confidence and Security-Building Measures (CSBMs), Open Skies, Dayton Article V negotiations, verification and information for European arms control, has responsibilities with respect to CFE Treaty issues, and participates fully in the Task Force on CFE under the Under Secretary.

53. Bureau Of Nonproliferation
Responsible for the missions of Arms Control, nonproliferation, and politicalmilitary affairs. Merged with the former Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Many fact sheets, treaties and reports.
http://www.state.gov/www/global/arms/bureaunp.html
The State Department web site below is a permanent electronic archive of information released prior to January 20, 2001. Please see www.state.gov for material released since President George W. Bush took office on that date. This site is not updated so external links may no longer function. Contact us with any questions about finding information. NOTE: External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views contained therein.
Please see current site for Bureau of Nonproliferation
Bureau of Nonproliferation One of the highest foreign policy and national security priorities of the United States is preventing the spread of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery. The Bureau of Nonproliferation gives a new emphasis to a broad range of efforts to curb proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, their delivery systems, and advanced conventional weapons. The Nonproliferation Bureau leads U.S. efforts to prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, chemical and biological weapons) and their missile delivery systems; to secure nuclear materials in the states of the former Soviet Union; and to promote nuclear safety and the protection of nuclear materials worldwide. It also leads U.S. efforts to promote responsibility, transparency, and restraint in international transfers of conventional arms and sensitive dual-use technology. The Bureau has primary responsibility for leadership in the interagency process for nonproliferation issues; leads major nonproliferation negotiations and discussions with other countries; and participates in all nonproliferation-related dialogues.

54. DOE Document - Studies Offer Alternative Futures For US Arms Control
December saw the release of two major reports on the future of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA).^One, entitled New Purposes and Priorities for Arms Control ` was mandated by Congress
http://rdre1.inktomi.com/click?u=http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.bib

55. Official US Executive Branch Web Sites
Official US Executive Branch Web Sites United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) United States International Trade Commission (USITC)
http://lcweb.loc.gov/global/executive/fed.html
Official US Executive Branch Web Sites
This page contains Executive Branch sites only. With the time we have available, it is not possible to
keep this page totally comprehensive. Agencies are often included because they requested to be listed.
For more government sites, see: Legislative Judicial or Government Resources in general.
EXECUTIVE BRANCH

56. Arms Control And Disarmament Agency
personnel also worked on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty 32nation Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR supported the implementation of US sanctions against
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/presrep98/acda.html
During FY 1998, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) continued to support missile nonproliferation efforts and worked to prevent the acquisition of offensive ballistic missile programs by other countries. ACDA personnel also worked on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) issues related to the use of excess ballistic missiles for space launch purposes. ACDA continued to work in strengthening and expanding the scope of the 32-nation Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), which is intended to limit the risks of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (that is, nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons) by controlling transfers that could make a contribution to delivery systems (other than piloted aircraft) for such weapons. During FY 1998, ACDA supported the inclusion of three new members to the MTCR. Poland, the Czech Republic, and the Ukraine were accepted at the MTCR meeting in May 1998 and officially participated at the October 1998 plenary in Budapest, Hungary. ACDA continued to participate in discussions focused on reformatting the MTCR Equipment and Technology Annex to make it more useful and effective. ACDA supported the implementation of U.S. sanctions against India and Pakistan because of their recent activities in this area.

57. Permanent Mission Of Japan To The United Nations
The website of the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations On Item 14, "Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency" News and Releases. Contact US. Japan the U.N. Conflict Prevention. Arms Control, Disarmament. and NonProliferation
http://www.un.int/japan/statements/armscontrol.html
By Theme
Human Security
Global Security Regional Issues ... Japan Links by Date by Theme General Debate Peacekeeping Development Issues Regional Issues ... H.E. Mr. Ozawa
Statements Pertaining to "Development"

58. Arms Control Association: Arms Control Today: The Case For Iraq's Qualitative Di
Subscribe To ACT. Contact US. Search. Arms Control Today the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Often overlooked in course, is what Arms Control and Disarmament are all about
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2000_06/iraqjun.asp
Home About ACA Employment Become A Member ... Contact Us Search Arms Control Today Current Issue Archived Issues Subscribe ... Links
Register for Arms Control Association e-mail updates
Arms Control Today June 2000
Printer Friendly
The Case for Iraq's Qualitative Disarmament
Scott Ritter
Efforts to resume weapons inspections in Iraq have long been at an impasse.It has been 18 months since inspectors from the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) were withdrawn from Iraq and six months since the Security Council created a successor organization to assume UNSCOM's mantle. Resolution 1284 established the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) in December 1999 and tasked it with verifying Iraq's elimination of its weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and ballistic missiles with a range greater than 150 kilometers. Resolution 687, which had originally spelled out this obligation, was viewed by many in the Security Council (including Russia, France, and China) as no longer viable given UNSCOM's untidy link to Operation Desert Fox, the 72-hour aerial bombardment of Iraq conducted in December 1998. At that time, the United States and the United Kingdom had used an UNSCOM report to the Security Council that laid out the record of Iraqi non-compliance with inspections as justification for the bombing¬óbefore the Security Council had any chance to deliberate on the report and without any authorization from that body. The unfortunate fallout from this military action was that Iraq not only refused to allow the UNSCOM inspectors to return, but also rejected any future cooperation with the organization. The inspection process was dead.

59. Abolish The Arms Control And Disarmament Agency
also would include the Agency for International Development (AID) and the US Information Agency The Arms Control and Disarmament Agency was established in
http://www.heritage.org/Research/MissileDefense/EM404.cfm
site map help contact us The Heritage Foundation ... ABM / Missile Defense EM404: Abolish the Arms Control Policy Archive:
view by date
Policy Archive:
view by issue
... Return Home Abolish the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency by John J. Tierney
Executive Memorandum #404
It is time to shut down the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA). Now that the Cold War is over, America no longer needs a separate bureaucracy dedicated to reducing nuclear arms. The United States already has arms control treaties in place that will take decades to implement. ACDA's arms control bureaucracy should be reorganized to eliminate functions that can be performed better by other government departments and to streamline those functions, such as treaty compliance and nonproliferation, that will be the focus of arms control efforts in the future. Abolishing ACDA is not a new idea. The State Department's own Inspector General concluded in December 1992 that ACDA "has lost ground to other agencies in recent years and its use as an instrument of government has declined." Among the hundreds of experts interviewed, the Inspector General admitted, there was "no consensus" as to what role ACDA should play "or even whether there is a role for a separate arms control agency." The report concluded by recommending the revitalization and "restructuring" of ACDA toward "high technical" issues, such as dismantling the former Soviet nuclear arsenal. More recently, senior officials at the State Department proposed merging ACDA into the department. The merger also would include the Agency for International Development (AID) and the U.S. Information Agency (USIA), as part of Vice President Gore's "Reinventing Government" initiative. On February 3, however, it was announced that Gore had rejected the State Department proposal. Given the flawed mandate under which ACDA is operating with the end of the Cold War, Congress should reconsider Gore's decision, but with an important change.

60. Government's 50 Greatest Endeavors: Increase Arms Control And Disarmament
s director would serve as chief Disarmament advisor to Congress directed the Agency to conduct and prepare recommendations on US Arms Control policy, establish
http://www.brookings.edu/gs/cps/50ge/endeavors/armscontrol.htm

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Increase Arms Control and Disarmament

Action to limit nuclear weapon development and use
Major Statutes:
  • 1957 PL 85-177 International Atomic Energy Treaty

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